Better Brain Health – We Are What We Eat

Chocolate reduces stress. Fish stimulates the brain. Is there any truth to such popular beliefs? The findings of researchers around the world say yes: It appears we really are what we eat.

A study in a British prison found that inmates who took vitamin supplements were less prone to violent behavior. And in Germany, a psychologist at the University of Lübeck has shown that social behavior is influenced by the ingredients consumed at breakfast. But what really happens in the brain when we opt for honey instead of jam, and fish rather than sausage? Scientists around the world are trying to find out. Neuro-nutrition is the name of an interdisciplinary research field that investigates the impact of nutrition on brain health. Experiments on rats and flies offer new insight into the effects of our eating habits. When laboratory rats are fed a diet of junk food, the result is not just obesity. The menu also has a direct influence on their memory performance. The role of the intestinal flora has been known for some time, but scientists are currently discovering other relationships. So-called “brain food” for example: The Mediterranean diet that’s based on vegetables and fish is said to provide the best nutrition for small grey cells. Omega-3 fatty acids, which are found in fish, for example, protect the nerve cells and are indispensable for the development of the brain – because the brain is also what it eats!

Deutsche Welle, 2020

Nutritional Minerals and the Periodic Table

What are nutritional minerals, and where do they come from? This video looks at the origin of nutritional minerals in a scientific sense. Starting with the periodic table, we go through the understanding of earth elements as atoms and structure of an atom as it applies to nutritional minerals. We finish up with the concept of different atoms coming together to form compounds.

Nutritional Epigenetics

This little video beautifully explains the concept of nutritional epigenetics. Working with international researchers, we published in 2013 a review on this topic:

Jalili M, Pati S, Rath B, Bjørklund G, Singh RB. Effect of Diet and Nutrients on Molecular Mechanism of Gene Expression Mediated by Nuclear Receptor and Epigenetic Modulation. Open Nutra J 2013;6:27-34.

More Than an Apple a Day: Preventing the Most Common Diseases (Lecture)

Michael Greger, MD presents in this lecture the latest in cutting-edge research on how a healthy diet can affect some of our most common medical conditions. Dr. Greger  is a CONEM member.

NutritionFacts org

 

GI Health and the Autsm Cascade (Lecture)

Liz Lipski, PhD, CCN is academic director of Nutrition & Integrative Health Programs at Maryland University of Integrative Health in Laurel, Maryland. She is author of the books Digestive Wellness, Digestion Connection, and Digestive Wellness for Children. Lipski is also a CONEM member. In this lecture, Dr. Lipski talks about digestive health issues in autism spectrum disorders. Many people on the spectrum have digestive health issues such as irritable bowel syndrome, pain, gas, bloating, diarrhea, constipation, bacterial and/or fungal infections, heartburn and more. This lecture focuses on understanding what problems can occur and offer practical solutions to enhance overall health by balancing digestive issues. This includes testing, special diets, and use of supplements and herbs for common issues. This lecture was held on 13 October 2012 at the Fall 2012 Autism Research Institute Conference in Garden Grove, California.

The Fundamentals of Magnesium (Lecture)

Image 17This is a presentation by the American physician and naturopathic doctor Carolyn Dean. She is Medical Director of the Nutritional Magnesium Association, and has been at the forefront of health issues for more than 30 years. Dr. Dean is author and coauthor of numerous books, including The Magnesium Miracle. She is a CONEM member.

A great deal of attention has been focused on calcium but not nearly as much on magnesium, yet these minerals work together and need to be balanced for good health. Magnesium, which many call the “miracle mineral” is involved in over 325 known biochemical reactions in the body and is vital for health restoration, maintenance and enhancement. It impacts heart health, bone health, energy production and storage, women’s health, men’s health, athletic performance and stress management.

An Integrative Approach to ADHD (Lecture)

Professor Sanford Newmark, MD, a CONEM member, explores in this lecture (2014) the importance of the Integrative Approach-seeing the child in the context of family, friends, school, and community, rather than as a set of symptoms that need to be fixed.

Dr. Newmark is a Clinical Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of California. He is the head of the Pediatric Integrative Neurodevelopmental Program at the Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, specializing in the treatment of autism, ADHD and other developmental or chronic childhood conditions.

Topics in this lecture include an overview of the genetic, environmental and neurobiological aspects, non-pharmaceutical therapies including nutrition, food sensitivities, vitamin and mineral supplements, parenting, school, and complementary therapies.